Equality Information and Objectives

Updated on: April 2014

Promoting equality and community cohesion at Ken Stimpson Community School

At Ken Stimpson we have a strong commitment to fairness and equality in everything that we do.

  • We try to ensure that everyone is treated fairly and with respect.
  • We work hard to make sure that the school is a safe and secure environment for everyone.
  • We recognise that people have different needs, and we understand that treating people equally does not always involve treating them all exactly the same. 
  • We recognise that for some pupils extra support is needed to help them to achieve and be successful.
  • We try to make sure that people from different groups are consulted and involved in our decisions, for example through talking to pupils and parents/carers, and through our School Council.
  • We aim to make sure that no-one experiences harassment, less favourable treatment or discrimination because of their age; any disability they may have; their ethnicity, colour or national origin; their gender; their gender identity or reassignment; their marital or civil partnership status; being pregnant or having recently had a baby; their religion or beliefs; their sexual identity and orientation.

We welcome our general duty under the Equality Act 2010 to have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination; to advance equality of opportunity; and to foster good relations.

We also welcome our specific duties to publish information about our school population; to explain how we have due regard for equality; and to publish equality objectives which show how we plan to tackle particular inequalities or disadvantages.

Meeting our duties to promote community cohesion, and the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of pupils, supports how we meet the needs of different groups of pupils and how we foster good relations.

We welcome the emphasis in the Ofsted inspection framework on the importance of narrowing gaps in achievement which affect, amongst others:

  • pupils from certain ethnic and cultural backgrounds
  • pupils who are supported by the pupil premium
  • pupils who are disabled
  • pupils who have special educational needs
  • boys in certain subjects, and girls in certain other subjects.

For more information about our work on equalities at Ken Stimpson please contact:

Bryan Erwin (Vice Principal)
Tel:      01733 765950                      Email:  b.erwin@kscs.org.uk

Ian Robson  (Vice Chair of the governing body with responsibility for equality issues)

Tel:      01733 765950                      Email:  pa@kscs.org.uk



Part 1: Information about the pupil population

Number of pupils on roll at the school (as of April 2014): 1049

Information on pupils by protected characteristics

The Equality Act protects people from discrimination on the basis of ‘protected characteristics’. Every person has several of the protected characteristics, so the Act protects everyone against unfair treatment.

The protected characteristics are disability, gender reassignment, pregnancy and maternity, race (ethnicity), religion and belief, sex (gender) and sexual orientation.

Disability

The Equality Act 2010 defines disability as when a person has a ‘physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long term adverse effect on that person’s ability to carry out normal day to day activities.’

Number of pupils with disabilities: 16

There are pupils at our school with different types of disabilities and these include:

  •  Hearing disabilities
  •  Physical disabilities
  •  Specific learning and behavioural disabilities such as dyslexia and ADHD

Pupil Special Educational Needs (SEN) Provision

 

Number of pupils

Percentage (%) of school population

No Special Education Need

940

89.6%

School Action or Early Years Action

65

6.1%

School Action Plus or Early Years Action Plus

19

1.9%

Statement

25

2.4%

 

Ethnicity and race

 

Percentage (%) of school population

 

Percentage (%) of school population

Asian

White

Bangladeshi

2 (0.19%)

British

712 (69%)

Chinese

2 (0.19%)

Irish

2 (0.19%)

Indian

16 (1.5%)

Traveller of Irish heritage

 

Pakistani

34 (3.2%)

Gypsy/Roma

5 (0.4%)

Other Asian heritage

4 (0.38%)

Other White background

168 (16%)

Black

Mixed

African

14 (1.4%)

Mixed White and Asian

10 (0.9%)

Other African

5 (0.4%)

Mixed White and Black African

6 (0.45%)

Caribbean

9 (0.85%)

Mixed White and Black Caribbean

24 (2.2%)

Other Asian (Pakistani)

34 (3.2%)

Other Mixed background

14 (1.33%)

Other ethnic group

17 (1.6%)

 

 

Information not obtained or refused

1

 

Gender

Male

529

Female

520

 

Religion and belief

 

Percentage (%) of school population

 

Percentage (%) of school population

Buddhist

  0%

Jewish

0%

Christian

  58.3%

Muslim

5%

Hindu

  1%

Sikh

0.5%

Jainism

  0%

Other religion

 

Other belief

4.6%

Information not provided / Unknown

31.5%

Gender reassignment

  • We do not collect data on pupils who are planning to undergo, who are undergoing or who have undergone gender reassignment.
  • Although it is rare for pupils to undergo a process of gender reassignment, when this happens it will always be managed with care and sensitivity.
  • We recognise that people who are undergoing a process to reassign their gender may experience discrimination and harassment.
  • Our behaviour policy promotes safety for all groups of pupils, regardless of gender identity.
  • We will always tackle any incidents of transgender bullying whether these are directed at pupils, teachers and other members of staff, parents and carers, or transgender people in the community.

 

Sexual orientation

  • We do not collect data on the sexual orientation of our pupils.
  • We are aware that there may be a number of equality issues for gay, lesbian and bisexual young people. We take seriously any incidents of homophobic bullying and use of homophobic language, such as use of the word ‘gay’ to mean something is bad or rubbish.
  • We do record incidents regarding sexual discrimination or homophobic bullying and report these to Governors on a termly basis.
  • Our behaviour policy promotes safety for all groups of pupils, regardless of sexuality.
  • We support pupils to develop the skills to be confident learners and accepting of one another’s lifestyles and beliefs, through the PSHE curriculum and the setting up of lunchtime meetings for those who wish to share or find out about different sexual orientations.

 The public sector equality duty

  • We are aware that under the Equality Act 2010 it is unlawful to discriminate, harass and victimise a person because of their age, sex, race, disability, religion or belief, gender reassignment, pregnancy and maternity or sexual orientation.
  • Our governing body has had training on the Equality Act 2010. When governors consider equality issues in relation to policies, decisions and services, a record of this is kept in the minutes and papers of governing body meetings.
  • We try to keep an accurate record, when possible and appropriate, of the protected characteristics of our pupils and employees.
  • Our home-school agreement sets out the standards of behaviour we expect from all pupils, including respect for others.
  • We have a school behaviour policy that includes the need for the school to act upon bullying of all types and forms.
  • We deal promptly and effectively with all incidents and complaints of bullying and harassment that may include cyber-bullying and prejudice-based bullying related to disability or special educational need, ethnicity and race, gender, gender reassignment, pregnancy or maternity, religion and belief and sexual orientation. We keep a record of all such incidents and notify those affected of what action we have taken. We provide training to all staff in relation to dealing with bullying and harassment incidents.
  • We have a special educational needs policy that outlines the provision the school makes for pupils with disabilities and special educational needs.
  • Our Accessibility Plan increases the extent to which all pupils can participate in the curriculum, improves the physical environment of the school and increases the availability of accessible information to disabled pupils.
  • Our admission arrangements provide opportunity to identify and to support any student who has a protected characteristic.
  • Our complaints procedure sets out how we deal with any complaints relating to the school.
  • We aim to observe and implement the principles of equal opportunities and non-discrimination in our employment practices.
  • We have procedures for addressing staff discipline, conduct and grievances.
  • We have a staff code of conduct that sets out the standards of professional behaviour expected from all members of staff. 

Disability

How we advance equality of opportunity:

  • We support disabled learners and staff by meeting their individual needs.
  • We take reasonable adjustments to ensure that disabled pupils are not put at a disadvantage compared to other pupils.
  • We will ensure that there is consultation with disabled learners, their families and disabled staff in the changes and improvements we make and consult them on issues affecting them, rather than relying on people acting on their behalf.
  • We carry out accessibility planning for disabled pupils that increases the extent to which they can participate in the curriculum, improves the physical environment of the school and increases the availability of accessible information to disabled pupils.

How we foster good relations and promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development:

  • The school is proud to have a very strong planned SMSC within the school. One qualitative  impact of this has been the school to gain externally accredited quality marks, such as the Specialism Quality Mark, The Arts Mark Gold Award, International Schools Award (Intermediate level) and the Healthy School Award.  We expect that the impact of undertaking the Leading Parents Partnership Award and the Equalities Award will further strengthen our SMSC, community cohesion, behaviour and parental engagement.
  • We enable all pupils to learn about the experiences of disabled people and the discriminatory attitudes they often experience.
  • We take part in events, such as Disability History Month, that celebrate the lives of disabled people and promote equality.
  • We ensure that the curriculum has positive images of disabled people.
  • The school tackles bullying or harassment on the basis of special education need or disability.
  • We tackle prejudice and any incidents of bullying based on disability.

Ethnicity and race (including EAL learners)

How we advance equality of opportunity:

  • We monitor the attainment and progress of all our pupils by ethnicity.
  • We set targets to improve the attainment and progression rates of particular groups of pupils.
  • We identify and address barriers to the participation of particular groups in learning and other activities.
  • We are developing particular initiatives to tackle the motivation and engagement in learning of particular groups.
  • We involve parents, carers and families in initiatives and interventions to improve outcomes for particular groups.
  • Where possible, we link with groups, organisations and projects in the local,  national and international community to provide a greater appreciation of cultures, languages, and religion to foster harmony and tolerance of one and another

How we foster good relations and promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development:

  • The school is proud to have a very strong planned SMSC within the school. One qualitative  impact of this has been the school to gain externally accredited quality marks, such as the Specialism Quality Mark, The Arts Mark Gold Award, International Schools Award (Intermediate level) and the Healthy School Award.  We expect that the impact of undertaking the Leading Parents Partnership Award and the Equalities Award will further strengthen our SMSC, community cohesion, behaviour and parental engagement.
  • We provide all pupils with opportunities to learn about the experiences and achievements of different communities and cultures.
  • We ensure that the curriculum challenges racism and stereotypes.
  • We organise celebrations and special events such as international evenings.
  • We take part in events such as Gypsy Roma Traveller History Month, Black History Month and Refugee Week.
  • The curriculum is supported by resources that provide positive images that reflect the diverse communities of modern Britain.
  • The school is has a clear policy outlined on our website, to students and staff of our intolerance of bullying or harassment on the basis of race, ethnicity and culture. The policy outlines our procedures and measures to ensure that the victim and the bully are dealt with appropriately and clear steps to monitor the situation after the matter has been reported and dealt with.

Gender

How we advance equality of opportunity:

  • We monitor the attainment of all our pupils by gender.
  • We take a "Which boys? Which girls?" approach to address underachievement: neither boys nor girls are treated as homogeneous groups.
  • We set targets to improve the attainment and rates of progress of particular groups of boys and girls.
  • We are identifying and addressing barriers to the participation of boys and girls in activities.
  • We ensure that gender stereotypes in subject choices, careers advice and work/university experience are avoided.
  • We ensure that young people have access to information about different sector workplaces and occupations to challenge outdated images and ideas about careers and employment. 
  • We work in partnership with other organisations, including FE and HE institutions, to develop innovative and inventive ways of tackling gender segregation in subject and career choice.
  • Parents, carers and families are given opportunities to contribute to the development, delivery and evaluation of the school's gender equality initiatives.
  • Both male and female parents and carers are encouraged to be involved in the work of the school and contribute to their children's learning and progress.

How we foster good relations and promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development:

  • The school is proud to have a very strong planned SMSC within the school. One qualitative  impact of this has been the school to gain externally accredited quality marks, such as the Specialism Quality Mark, The Arts Mark Gold Award, International Schools Award (Intermediate level) and the Healthy School Award.  We expect that the impact of undertaking the Leading Parents Partnership Award and the Equalities Award will further strengthen our SMSC, community cohesion, behaviour and parental engagement.
  • We ensure we respond to any sexist bullying or sexual harassment in line with the school policies.
  • We encourage pupils to develop an understanding of the experiences of different genders in society and challenge sexism and negative stereotypes.
  • Ensuring the inclusion of positive, non-stereotypical images of women and men, girls and boys across the curriculum

 


Gender identity or reassignment

How we advance equality of opportunity:

  • We recognise that all gender variant children should be supported and protected whether or not they undertake transition.
  • We understand that transgender pupils who are entering puberty may experience intensifying stress, which may have a negative impact on their schoolwork. We take steps to provide appropriate and sensitive support to ensure that learning is not disrupted.
  • We will ensure that transgender staff are safe and comfortable in the school environment.

How we foster good relations and promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development:

  • The school is proud to have a very strong planned SMSC within the school. One qualitative  impact of this has been the school to gain externally accredited quality marks, such as the Specialism Quality Mark, The Arts Mark Gold Award, International Schools Award (Intermediate level) and the Healthy School Award.  We expect that the impact of undertaking the Leading Parents Partnership Award and the Equalities Award will further strengthen our SMSC, community cohesion, behaviour and parental engagement.
  • We aim to tackle all incidents of transgender bullying whether these are directed at pupils, teachers and other members of staff, parents and carers, or transgender people in the community.
  • All staff, including lunchtime supervisors and teaching assistants, have received information and training in how to deal with transphobic language and bullying.
  • Our curriculum, including PSHE, encourages pupils to develop understanding of and respect for difference, and challenge negative stereotypes.

Religion and belief

How we advance equality of opportunity:

  • Add a statement to explain how the school is tacking any barriers that might prevent pupils with particular beliefs from taking a full part in school life.
  • Add a statement on how you support pupils to build their sense of identity and belonging, which helps them flourish within their communities and as citizens in a diverse society.

How we foster good relations and promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development:

  • The school is proud to have a very strong planned SMSC within the school. One qualitative  impact of this has been the school to gain externally accredited quality marks, such as the Specialism Quality Mark, The Arts Mark Gold Award, International Schools Award (Intermediate level) and the Healthy School Award.  We expect that the impact of undertaking the Leading Parents Partnership Award and the Equalities Award will further strengthen our SMSC, community cohesion, behaviour and parental engagement.
  • Our curriculum, including RE, supports pupils to be accepting of one another’s lifestyles and beliefs, as well as exploring shared values.
  • The RE curriculum enables pupils to develop respect for others, including people with different faiths and beliefs, and helps to challenge prejudice and discrimination.
  • Add details of particular initiatives such as collective worship, assemblies and visits to local faith communities.
  • Add a statement on how the school is tackling bullying or harassment on the basis of faith and belief.
  • We tackle prejudices relating to racism and xenophobia, including those that are directed towards religious groups and communities, such as antisemitism and Islamophobia.
  • We participate in award and accreditation schemes such as the Equalities and International Schools Awards.

Sexual orientation

How we advance equality of opportunity:

  • Diversity and inclusion are threaded through the curriculum. Books and resources include images of a range of different kinds of families.
  • We have carefully considered how to appropriately integrate sexual orientation into the curriculum in a positive and constructive way, which enables both heterosexual and gay pupils to understand and respect difference and diversity.
  • We ensure that gay, lesbian and bisexual staff of staff feel comfortable, and are supported to be open about their sexual orientation.

How we foster good relations and promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development:

  • The school is proud to have a very strong planned SMSC within the school. One qualitative  impact of this has been the school to gain externally accredited quality marks, such as the Specialism Quality Mark, The Arts Mark Gold Award, International Schools Award (Intermediate level) and the Healthy School Award.  We expect that the impact of undertaking the Leading Parents Partnership Award and the Equalities Award will further strengthen our SMSC, community cohesion, behaviour and parental engagement.
  • We support pupils to develop the skills to be confident learners and accepting of one another’s lifestyles and beliefs, through the PSHE curriculum and programmes such as SEAL.
  • We use opportunities in circle time to talk about difference and different families to ensure all children, including those with gay and lesbian parents, feel included and know it’s alright to be different.
  • All staff, including lunchtime supervisors and teaching assistants, have received information and training in how to deal with homophobic language and how to work positively with different families.
  • We participate in award and accreditation schemes such as Stonewall School Champions.
  • Posters and pictures around the school are selected to reflect the full range of cultures that attend the school.
  • We work with positive role models to help reduce bullying, provide support and make young people feel confident and comfortable.

Part 2: Our equality objectives

The Equality Act 2010 requires us to publish specific and measurable equality objectives. Our equality objectives are based on our analysis of data and other information. Our equality objectives focus on those areas where we have agreed to take action to improve equality and tackle disadvantages.

We regularly review the progress we are making to meet our equality objectives.

Equality objective 1: (To eradicate homophobic or derogative language)

Why we have chosen this objective:

To ensure that our students are respectful, polite caring citizens.

To achieve this objective we plan to:

  1. Conduct  assemblies to address the reasons for and consequences for derogative language
  2. Tutor time activities to promote the use of positive language by all students
  3. Posters and plasma screens to promote positive language and behaviour

Progress we are making towards achieving this objective:

Communication Referrals reporting the use of homophobic/derogative language reduced to zero.

Bullying logs do not report any incidents of homophobic language being used or homophobia.

Equality objective 2: To ensure that Roma/Slovak students positive contribute to the school life and meet their expected targets.
Why we have chosen this objective:

To ensure that an identified cohort of students maximise their potential, attend regularly and contribute fully to the school life.

To achieve this objective we plan to:

  1. Positive reward Roma/Slovak students to reach and attendance rate of at least 95%.
  2. Provide bespoke curriculum opportunities to boost their English language, writing and reading skills.

Progress we are making towards achieving this objective:

Tracking of attendance for this cohort will show an upward trend of attendance over an academic term and year.

Student feedback indicates that they enjoy school and feel it is a safe and purposeful environment.

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Ken Stimpson Community School, Staniland Way, Werrington, Peterborough, PE4 6JT